J. Levine slates ‘Timeless’ coin, currency auction Dec. 11

Several hundred domestic and foreign coins, currency and stamps will be auctioned on Thurs., Dec. 11 at J. Levine Auction & Appraisal during the high-end auction house’s “Timeless Currency” specialty auction.

Several hundred domestic and foreign coins, currency and stamps will be auctioned on Thurs., Dec. 11 at J. Levine Auction & Appraisal during the high-end auction house’s “Timeless Currency” specialty auction.

The public can preview items on Wed., Dec. 10 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and again starting at 9 a.m. on Thursday before the auction begins at 11 a.m. J. Levine is located at 10345 N. Scottsdale Road, in Scottsdale.

Josh Levine, auctioneer and owner of J. Levine Auction & Appraisal, said the auction’s diverse collection of coins, currency and stamps will likely attract bidders worldwide.

“Coins have always been solid, even during the recession,” Levine said. “Things to take into consideration include rarity, how many coins were in the mintage, whether the coin is silver or gold, distinct symbols and even errors made on the coin, like a misstrike, where the design is stamped off-center. People are willing to pay for scarcity.”

Old American paper bills pre-dating 1900 are considered to be “hot” right now. Fractional notes, which were used between 1862 and 1876, also will likely fetch a pretty penny at auction.

When it comes to foreign coins, Levine warns against making assumptions based on the coin’s age.

“Everything depends on the mintage. An old Roman coin is not necessarily rare because there were so many of them. But silver and gold Roman coins will be valuable because only a small number were made for the aristocrats.”

In addition to coins and currency, the Dec. 11 auction will include several hundred domestic and foreign postage stamps with a wide variety of designs. David Wilkinson, J. Levine’s director of Specialty Auctions, said a stamp’s condition and rarity determines its value.

“This past June, the world’s most famous stamp, the British Guiana One-Cent Black on Magenta, set a new world auction record at Sotheby’s New York when it sold for $9,480,000,” Wilkinson said.\

And while it may be some time before another stamp sells for 1 billion times its original face value, Wilkinson said stamp collectors are always searching for that rare find that will enhance their collection.

“Stamps tell a story and place us back in time and location,” he said.

“There are so many factors that go in to determining a stamp’s value. For example, mint stamps with the original gum on the back are worth more than used stamps. But, used stamps and its postmarks can have great value. Even designs and other postal markings on an envelope can add value to a stamp’s worth.”

Auctions are subject to a 15 percent Buyers Premium (20 percent for Internet and phone bidders). Live online bidding can be accessed through www.jlevines.com or through www.Artfact.com. For information, visit www.jlevines.com or call (480) 496-2212.  

 

 

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