Tour stop in Scottsdale provides free, close-up look at vintage cars

A 1907 Stevens-Duryea Model U driven by owner Alan Travis of Phoenix in last year’s Arizona Tour d’Elegance (submitted photo)

A 1907 Stevens-Duryea Model U driven by owner Alan Travis of Phoenix in last year’s Arizona Tour d’Elegance (submitted photo)

A free public showing of the spectacular vintage automobiles from the Arizona Concours d’Elegance takes place on Monday, Jan. 25, when the Arizona Tour d’Elegance rolls into Old Town Scottsdale.

Classic Duesenbergs to stunning Ferraris, sporty Allards to unique Zagato designs, and many others will start arriving shortly after noon on Marshall Way, which will be closed off between Third and Fifth avenues.

The cars will be parked for public viewing for about two hours while the entrants have lunch before proceeding on the next leg of the tour, according to a press release.

The Marshall Way stop provides a glimpse of the rare and exceptional vehicles on the road rather than in static display.  Come early to see the cars arrive and stay to watch them drive off.

The Tour d’Elegance is held on the day following the third annual Arizona Concours, which fills the inner lawns of the Arizona Biltmore Resort with more than 90 examples of automotive history on Sunday, Jan. 24.

A  1954 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing (front) and a 1954 Fiat 8V coupe parked during last year’s Arizona Tour d’Elegance. (submitted photo)

A 1954 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing (front) and a 1954 Fiat 8V coupe parked during last year’s Arizona Tour d’Elegance. (submitted photo)

The daylong tour runs along 75 miles of scenic roads in and around the Phoenix/Scottsdale area, and is expected to be undertaken by many of the Concours cars, which range from early brass-era models, through the great classics of the ’20s and ’30s, to post-war sports cars, exotics and unique masterpieces of automotive design.

“The Tour d’Elegance is held to reward the owners of the cars in the best way possible,” stated Scott McPherson, the Arizona Concours committee member who organizes the tour, in the release. “That is, to drive their prized possessions with fellow enthusiasts.” Now in its second year, the driving tour incorporates viewings of private collections and historically significant Arizona landmarks.

The annual Arizona Concours d’Elegance, which starts off Arizona’s famed Classic Car Week of auctions and events, benefits Make-A-Wish® Arizona, the founding chapter of the national foundation that grants wishes for children with life-threatening medical conditions.

Tickets for the Arizona Concours d’Elegance are priced at $80 in advance or $100 at the door. The Arizona Concours is a boutique automotive event and tickets are strictly limited, so guests are urged to purchase them as soon as possible; the January 2015 event was a sellout.

Three panel discussions will be held on Saturday, Jan. 23, at the Arizona Biltmore: the Phoenix Automotive Press Association preview of the collector car auctions in the Scottsdale/Phoenix area, a round table talk with six winning drivers of the Indianapolis 500, and a design seminar with Andrea Zagato, the third generation of his family to lead Carrozzeria Zagato since its founding in 1919, and J Mays, the former head of global design for Ford Motor Company.

“This year’s public viewing on Marshall Way in Old Town Scottsdale will showcase around 60 of the Concours cars, and will include live entertainment,” Mr. McPherson stated in the release. “We hope to grow this free event in future years, further allowing residents and visitors to enjoy these magnificent automobiles.”

For tickets and information about all these events, visit ArizonaConcours.com. Also available on the website is the Arizona Concours mobile app.

The Arizona Concours d’Elegance is a not-for-profit corporation registered with the State of Arizona, with federal 501(c)(3) status.

The Scottsdale Independent is published monthly and mailed to 75,000 homes and businesses in Scottsdale.

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