Grand Canyon Chapter DAR completes historical trail marker project

From left is Jean Howell, chapter  publicity chairman; Carmen Wendt, chapter recording secretary; Kandy Wagenbach, chapter special projects grants chairman; Jill Hanon, chapter DAR project patriot chairman; Norma Patterson, chapter member; Leonard Marcisz, Historian, McDowell Mountain Regional Park; Marian Hulka, chapter women’s issues chairman; Katie Paulsen, chapter honorary regent. (submitted photo)

From left is Jean Howell, chapter publicity chairman; Carmen Wendt, chapter recording secretary; Kandy Wagenbach, chapter special projects grants chairman; Jill Hanon, chapter DAR project patriot chairman; Norma Patterson, chapter member; Leonard Marcisz, Historian, McDowell Mountain Regional Park; Marian Hulka, chapter women’s issues chairman; Katie Paulsen, chapter honorary regent. (submitted photo)

Scottsdale-chartered Grand Canyon Chapter National Society Daughters of the American Revolution commemorated the finished restoration of the Stoneman Trail Military Route Marker Saturday, March 19 at McDowell Mountain Regional Park.

The original marker was placed by the Arizona State Society DAR Oct. 25, 1997, during the administration of state regent Patricia Godber. Mrs. Godber also served as Grand Canyon DAR chapter regent, according to a press release.

The Stoneman Road was an important conduit between 1870 and 1890 for shipping supplies from Fort Whipple in Prescott to Fort McDowell near present-day Fountain Hills.  The route, of which only minimal traces remain, was named after General George Stoneman.  On April 10, 1890, Fort McDowell was vacated by the U.S. military and became Fort McDowell Indian Reservation.

“The importance of the Daughters of the American Revolution lies in preserving the human experience behind American history and honoring the values that make our country great,” stated McDowell Mountain Regional Park historian Leonard Marcisz.

Grand Canyon Chapter was awarded a grant by the National Society DAR in the amount of $1,550 for the marker restoration. Funding for the project was made possible through the sponsorship of the chapter.

Work on the project entailed replacing the original wood marker with marble, retaining the original bronze plaque.

“I want to thank the National Society DAR officers and chairmen who made the Special Projects grant available to our chapter, the Arizona State DAR officers for their support, and chapter members for their role in the project’s rededication,” stated Kandy Wagenbach, in the release.

The DAR grants program was started in 2010 to support projects in local communities which promote the society’s mission of historic preservation, education and patriotism.

The National Society Daughters of the American Revolution was founded in 1890. Any woman over the age of 18 who can prove lineal descent from a Revolutionary War patriot is eligible to join. To learn more about today’s DAR, visit www.DAR.org. To apply for a DAR Special Projects grant, visit www.DAR.org/grants.

The next Grand Canyon DAR chapter meeting is April 2. Guests are welcome.  For information on Grand Canyon Chapter DAR visit http://grandcanyon.arizonadar.org

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