City: Scottsdale Airport Operations Center is open for business

A picturesque view of the new state-of-the-art Scottsdale Airport Operations Center. (Photo courtesy of the city of Scottsdale)

The Airport Operations Center at Scottsdale Airport is the hub for monitoring daily operations including safety, security and maintenance of the airfield.

This building is a state-of-the-art facility and also environmentally friendly, according to a May 3 press release. The total cost for the project was $4.9 million, city officials say.

The U.S. Green Building Council recognized Scottsdale’s Airport Operations Center, 15255 N. Airport Drive, with the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Silver certification.

The award recognizes the Scottsdale Airport Operations Center project for its sustainable, green building qualities, the release states.

Most new city buildings are required to be built to LEED Gold standards per Section 2 of Resolution No. 6644. Unfortunately, during the design, staff and the architects were only able to achieve LEED Silver standards mainly because of the inability to install solar panels due to the possibility of glare or reflection to pilots flying into or out of the airport, the release states.

“We are proud of achieving this certification,” said Scottsdale Aiport Director Gary Mascaro in a prepared statement.  “Not only is it a modern and sleek building, but it was designed to meet this high level of sustainable standards.”

The Scottsdale Airport Operations Center is a new, two-story 10,000-square-foot building. It is a steel-framed building with a rusted steel panel façade and bonderized metal siding, according to city officials.

The project employed many sustainable strategies including:

  • Parking for low-emitting and fuel efficient vehicles;
  • Bicycle racks;
  • Daylighting for interior spaces;
  • Roofing does not contribute to heat island effect;
  • Low-flow plumbing fixtures;
  • No CFC based refrigerants;
  • Building materials that were sourced locally were given preference;
  • Building materials with a high recycled content were given preference; and
  • Materials and products with low or no volatile organic compounds (VOC’s) were used in the interior.

The Scottsdale Independent is published monthly and mailed to 75,000 homes and businesses in Scottsdale.

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