Through partnership Scottsdale Schools students learn 3D printing

Scottsdale students from left, top row: Ben Corn, Brandon Roat, Asher Curtis, Olivia Gomez. Bottom row: Atticus Roat, Luke Curtis, Libby Robson, Max D’Onofrio, Sophia Herd and Tyler Gomez. (Submitted photo)

Scottsdale students from left, top row: Ben Corn, Brandon Roat, Asher Curtis, Olivia Gomez. Bottom row: Atticus Roat, Luke Curtis, Libby Robson, Max D’Onofrio, Sophia Herd and Tyler Gomez. (Submitted photo)

The Shemer Art Center, in partnership with Arizona State University and STAX3D Printing, is offering the opportunity for students ages 9-13 attending Title 1 schools in the Scottsdale Unified School District to learn about 3D printing by participating in the 2016 TechKids Workshop, which was made possible by a grant from the Phoenix Rotary.

Through its partnership with ASU and STAX3D, participating students in our first session had the opportunity to tour the Shemer Art Center, talk about the process of building a three-dimensional object as they viewed various sculptures on the grounds at the Shemer, according to a press release.

Positioned at the intersection of the STEAM-based education model, this workshop allows students to learn how to translate isometric drawings into three-dimensional models, the release states.

Then they learned about and witnessed their model manifest into a 3D printed object. 3D printing is one technique of the several processes known as additive manufacturing, a transformational technology that is poised within the next decade to up-end the most common methods of product design, manufacturing and art making.

“In just a short period of time, these students were able to learn about and conceptualize a three-dimensional image, which they then designed using 3D software,” said Andre Noble, a graduate student at Arizona State University who is leading the TechKids Workshop in a prepared statement.

“Imagine what these students will be able to do in the future just from having the opportunity to learn this technology now.”

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