Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community marks project milestone

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The Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community recently celebrated the topping out of the Salt River Judicial Center, a complex that will house the community’s tribal court, legal services, prosecutors and defense advocates offices.

The project is a joint venture of Au’Authum Ki and Kitchell, a collaboration that also completed the SRPMIC Detention Facility. Gould Evans is the project architect.

“When complete, this project will set a new standard for future justice centers,” stated SRPMIC President Delbert Ray, Sr., in a press release.

The topping out – the ceremonial signing of the last steel beam on a project – was led by President Ray, along with, Chief Judge Ryan Andrews, Legal Services Director Kierstin Anderson and Defense Advocates Director Vincent Barraza, along with members of the building and design team.

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Located at the northeast corner of Longmore and Osborn roads in Scottsdale, the multi-level, 92,000 square-foot facility will consolidate tribal government departments and house courtrooms, judicial chambers, court administration and detainee holding areas and a single-story building will house legal departments. The project includes expansion of a central plant and installation of a new 625-ton chiller, the release stated.

The project already was recognized with a design award by AIA Arizona in the “Unbuilt Award” category, and described by the judging panel as “aspirational.”

Bounded by the cities of Scottsdale, Tempe, Mesa and Fountain Hills, the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community encompasses 52,600 acres, with 19,000 held as a natural preserve, the release stated.

The Scottsdale Independent is published monthly and mailed to 75,000 homes and businesses in Scottsdale.

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