Eclectic docket of Corvettes slated to cross Barrett-Jackson block

Barrett-Jackson, The World’s Greatest Collector Car Auctions®, is set to light up the auction block with an eclectic docket of Chevrolet Corvettes during the nine-day 45th Anniversary Auction from Jan. 23 to 31, 2016, at WestWorld of Scottsdale.

This 1957 Corvette was not only the first production 283ci Corvette, but the first production 283ci Chevrolet vehicle with the majority of the components dated July 1956, including the engine, transmission and differential.

This 1957 Corvette was not only the first production 283ci Corvette, but the first production 283ci Chevrolet vehicle with the majority of the components dated July 1956, including the engine, transmission and differential.

Among these highly sought-after American cars are three VIN #001 Corvette convertibles from 1955 to 1957, a 1954 roadster that was entombed until 1986, as well as two of the greatest original 1967 427/435s to ever cross the block.

“I couldn’t be more excited about the docket of Corvettes that are consigned for our 45th Anniversary Auction in Scottsdale this coming January,” said Craig Jackson, chairman and CEO of Barrett-Jackson.

“We always have exceptional groupings of Corvettes at our auctions, but this may be the best we’ve ever consigned.”

Three VIN #001 Corvettes from 1955, 1956 and 1957 will cross the auction block at the 45th Anniversary Scottsdale Auction.

The 1955 convertible (Lot #1351), wearing a Polo White exterior, features a 265ci V8 engine and scored a 99.3 that led to a 2008 NCRS Top Flight award.

The Venetian Red and white 1956 convertible (Lot #1352) features the first dual 4-barrel production engine and is rated at 225hp with a special solid-lifter Duntov 098 camshaft.

The third VIN #001 Corvette is a 1957 Cascade Green and beige convertible (Lot #1353).  It was not only the first production 283ci Corvette, but the first production 283ci Chevrolet vehicle with the majority of the components dated July 1956, including the engine, transmission and differential.

Among the most anticipated Corvettes set to star at the 45th Anniversary Scottsdale Auction is the famous “Entombed” Corvette. This 1954 Corvette roadster (Lot #1279) was owned by Richard Sampson, a successful business man in Maine who entombed the car in a brick and mortar vault in 1959.

It was removed by Sampson’s daughter in 1986 and has been preserved ever since. An amazing piece of American history, this Corvette has the same 2,335 miles that were on the odometer when it was finally saw daylight again, 28 years after its entombment.

“Every one of these Corvettes has a story associated with it,” said Steve Davis, president of Barrett-Jackson. “It has been exciting to work with their owners who have cared for these remarkable collector cars. I think it will be just as exciting to see these cars pass on to the next set of owners, who will help carry on and preserve these amazing Corvette legacies.

Originally owned by musician Freddie Haeffner, the 1967 Corvette 427/435 convertible (Lot #1372) has been nicknamed the “Music Car.” Purchased in 1967, it was used to promote Haeffner’s band in car shows and parades until 1987.

The Corvette has received multiple Bloomington Gold certificates, is part of the Bloomington Gold Hall of Fame, is also a five-time NCRS Regional or National Top Flight award recipient and was awarded the coveted NCRS Duntov Mark of Excellence.

To preview additional Chevrolet Corvettes consigned for the 2016 Barrett-Jackson 45th Anniversary Auction in Scottsdale, click here.

For more information on becoming a bidder, follow the link to www.barrett-jackson.com/bid.

Information on available packages and how to be a part of this world-class lifestyle event is available here.

For more information about Barrett-Jackson, visit http://www.barrett-jackson.com, or call 480-421-6694.

 

The Scottsdale Independent is published monthly and mailed to 75,000 homes and businesses in Scottsdale.

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